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Oct 05, 2022   |  7:56PM AET

A TRUE LEADER: Jamieson reflects on his first 299 ALM appearances

A TRUE LEADER: Jamieson reflects on his first 299 ALM appearances

Just five players in A-Leagues history are part of the 300-appearance club, but City Captain Scott Jamieson is set to join that esteemed group on Friday night.

Although his professional career may’ve begun a few years earlier chasing his Premier League dream in England with Bolton Wanderers, an A-League debut came in Adelaide United’s 2008/09 season opener against Perth Glory where he assisted the winner.

In his early years in the competition prior to joining City, like many players, Jamieson bounced around a few different clubs, but said looking back, he wouldn’t do anything differently.

“I’m not ashamed to have clocked up a few clubs,” Jamieson said.

“There’s never been behaviour issues, or it was never that I wasn’t good enough.

“It was simply just at those times, I chose to leave for reasons I thought would benefit my family, myself and my career, and as is always the case in life, some played out and some didn’t.”

Following a stint in Sweden, Jamieson found a home for good in 2017 when he signed with City on an almost unheard of at the time four-year deal.

From day 1 he felt at home, impressed straight away with the professionalism and ambitions of a club that echoed his own values and drive to succeed.

“It was a pivotal moment,” he said.

“Being in that new surrounding and seeing the state of the facilities and the professionalism and expectations of the football club after walking in that day was something I really enjoyed.”

Now in his sixth year with the club, Jamieson has gone through the rollercoaster every footballer does – there’s been highs, lows and some tough decisions along the way.

After COVID first took its grip on the world in 2020, the A-League was forced to move to Sydney to complete the 2019/20 season. Big moments were on the horizon for both Jamieson and his family at this time.

City qualified for its first Men’s Grand Final in club history – but ultimately it would be without its inspirational leader.

With quarantine restrictions looming large, Jamieson made the tough call to return to Melbourne to be there for the birth of his first child, something that from a ‘family and life sense’, he never gave a second thought.

“Seeing my son being now close to two and a half just brings me the greatest joy I’ve ever, ever had, so to be there for the birth was amazing,” Jamieson said.

“Of course, when it comes to game time and you’re sitting in the living room watching everything pan out, it does gets a bit hard.

“You want to play, compete and be a part of it, but it wasn’t to be. It was made a bit easier to not be there because I had full trust in the players and what we had done, but ultimately, we just fell short that year.”

The following season would be the most successful of his career to date, leading a dominant City outfit to an inaugural Premiers Plate and Championship, more than making up for the disappointment of the previous year.

When reflecting on a couple of the best nights in his career, there was little surprise that Jamieson – the ultimate clubman – quickly deflected to the impact the success had on others.

“To be a part of that triumphant night and have the celebrations, not just as players but with people from all parts of the organisation was really special,” he said.

“Having my partner and son there and to celebrate it with my family are memories that will live in my mind for a long time, but they are certainly memories I want to replicate again.”

While it won’t come as a shock to the many City fans who’ve had the pleasure of meeting and getting to know ‘Jamo’, the upcoming 300 appearance milestone isn’t something he’s spent too long focussing on.

“I think come the end of my career when I’m looking back, it’ll hit home more,” he said.

“I’m not one to sit here and say, ‘well, I’ve clocked 300, It’s time to turn off the lights and go home,’ I’m the kind of person that will look straight towards the next.

“If I am selected and clock the 300 this Friday, it’ll turn to Saturday recovery and then trying to back up, keep my position and kick on.”